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Archive for the ‘Biblical Interpretation’ Category

I could use some helpers, from near or far. Here’s the situation.

I’ve been doing a series in our second services on “Reformed Biblical Theology” (or Covenant Theology, if you like), tracing the one unfolding plan of God to save His people through Christ. The original purpose – beyond edifying our own folks locally – was to build a distance learning course for Westminster Theological Academy, our denomination’s program to train Liberian pastors and theological students. Since then, opportunities to use it among Spanish speakers have developed, both at home and abroad. A theological academy in Latin America has expressed interest in it, and now I’ve been approached by a Hispanic pastor here in Providence who is trying to get a Bible school off the ground.

Because my Spanish is not yet at the level where I can preach and teach in it, I need to utilize helpers. I’m considering a subscription to a transcription service to render my sermons/lectures into English manuscripts. Before they are translated into Spanish, I just need a volunteer (or more) to listen to the original audio, edit, and perfect the English manuscript. Then, I could a bilingual helper – fluent in English & Spanish – to translate the English manuscript into a Spanish one. We can then take it from there, whether reading and recording into audio, or utilizing for video subtitles.

To give you an idea of what you’d be working with, this sermon/lecture has been transcribed here.

Interested in helping? Drop me a note: mjives dot refparish at gmail dot com. Or, 401-484-8089.

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Here is something I designed for our catechism class to help young and old track with the main contours of Covenant Theology and its bearing on redemptive history. Comments below.

S Cat 020 The Covenants [CCat]

Much of this is self-explanatory for those with a working knowledge of Reformed doctrine. But a bit of clarification on my design. I added a dashed, horizontal line & arrow from Covenant of Works moving through the OT and NT dispensations to help reduce the impression that it is somehow a cipher after the Fall. I also configured the OT period to begin at Sinai (as technically it does), though canonically it usually embraces everything from Genesis to Malachi. Third, the dashed, vertical line above Sinai intersecting the horizontal lines of the Moral and Ceremonial law is intended to reflect the development and institutionalization of the latter and the explicit publication of the former. Last, the dashed and hard vertical lines at the cross represent the distinction between the definitive abolition of these laws at 33(-ish) A.D. and their actual, outward end with the destruction of the Temple and Jerusalem in 70 A.D.

I omitted the ‘biblical’ covenants (Noahic, Abrahamic, Davidic), leaving that for another day and another diagram.

And now you’ll need a chart to understand all that! Seriously, though, if you can help me perfect this further, I’m open. Just as long as you’re no Dispy, Hyper-Preterist, or any of the countless bunny trails from good old 1646 Federalism.

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“We would appeal, in this connection – progressiveness – specially to the practical and practicable character of Old-Testament legislation. And thus we are led to assert that those very passages concerning polygamy and kindred themes (which have been made an occasion of gibe against the Scriptures) are themselves a most cogent argument for their divine origin. We Americans ought to know by this time that the best way to secure polygamy unharmed and enshrine it unconquerably under the protection of a nation is to write on the statute-books inoperative laws against it. The Bible was framed by too wise a statesman to fall into that error, and we who enjoy Christian homes to-day have to thank God for it. The unspeakable wisdom of dealing at that age, and under those circumstances, with polygamy, divorce, slavery by regulative laws, which in regulating discouraged, and in discouraging destroyed them, makes strongly for a superhuman origin of the legislation.”

– B. B. Warfield

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St.-Jerome-In-His-StudyIn preparing for a message on the Parable of the Sower, I’ve looked at Jerome (ca. 347 – 420) among others.  Many of his comments are extremely helpful.  But as with all commentators, there is some chaff mixed in with the wheat.  When writing about the three levels of fruit among those who receive the seed in good soil, he declares, “The hundred-fold fruit is to be ascribed to virgins, the sixty-fold to widows and continent persons, the thirty-fold to chaste wedlock.”  Wrong on two counts – bad interpretation and bad theology.

 

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